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Category: Videos

This is a short one!

This video covers the pronunciation and semantic clues of words ending in -able and words ending in -ive.

How do you pronounce an “a” if it’s at the end of a word? This one’s pretty easy. Just tell your students at some point… or better yet, ask them if they’ve noticed the pattern.

This video covers the spelling pattern of “al” or “le” at the end of words. It’s about polysyllabic words such as “noble”, not single syllable words like “pal” or “vale”. Aside from the pronunciation of the “le” itself, the “le” also interacts with preceding vowels.

And yeah, this is a good one to know if you ever want to read Fox in Sox!

When beetles fight these battles in a bottle with their paddles
and the bottle’s on a poodle and the poodle’s eating noodles…
…they call this a muddle puddle tweetle poodle beetle noodle
bottle paddle battle.

Sometimes words with a “ch” sound are spelled with a “tch” in which the “t” is silent. Other times, the “ch” sound is spelled without a “t”. What’s the pattern? When do you spell words with “ch” vs “tch”?

Why is it that the to make the plural form of “hobby”, you change the “y” to “ies”? But to make the plural form of other words ending in “y”, like “toy”, you just add an “s”? Why do you add “es” to make “potato” plural? How about “loaf” and “loaves”? Is that just an exception?

If you don’t know, then this is phonics video for you!

How do you pronounce an S at the end of the word? Well, sometimes it sounds like an S and other times it sounds like a Z. This video covers the phonics rule for that and also a fun way of helping your students remember when to add “es” to a plural noun or 3rd person singular verb.

Have a great 2013, everybody!

Have you ever thought about how the “or” in “word” doesn’t sound like an “or”?

In this video, I talk about one of my favorite spelling patterns. The reason I like it so much is that it covers a set of words that many people feel are spelling exceptions… but they aren’t! They’re just following a pattern at a slightly higher order.

In Phonics Friday #12, I talked about silent letters. One thing I didn’t go over was the ubiquitous “gh” pattern, so here it is today, along with a few other silent G words. Since the spelling/phonics rule is so simple, the bigger focus is getting your students to internalize it and start using it actively. If you can do that, it will stick for a very long time without review due to the many high frequency words that will remind them – night, right, eight, weigh, etc…

In this video I go over common pairs of letters in which one is silent– how to pronounce “wr”, “wh”, “rh” and “kn”. I also talk about why the tea in American convenience stores is so bad.

Notes:
Words with “gh” will come in a future Phonics Friday.
Long vowel spellings such as “when two vowels go walking the first one does the talking” were covered in Phonics Friday #1 – Long vowels.