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What I’ve learned from blogging for an entire decade

Part 1: before the blog (you are here)
Part 2: meeting other bloggers
Part 3: how blogging helped me as an entrepreneur
Part 4: The biggest drawback to blogging


The first glimpse of a different life

When I was in college, blogging was new and exciting. As I was starting this site, other members of the Nintendo Generation were starting theirs, too. Some were like diaries, some were focused on personal interests many were mashups of both. I was enthralled by them. These blogs weren’t wooden news reports. They were often unfiltered and a closer look at what life was actually like for other people. One of the saddest parts of the growth of Facebook is that personal blogs have largely been subsumed by wall posts—nearly always a much less honest look at someone’s life.

I had become very interested in what it was like to live abroad. I couldn’t afford to and had actually chosen my school based on price. I desperately wanted to get out and experience life in a place different from where I’d grown up. It felt impossible at the time, but I knew that once I graduated I could go abroad to teach English. I’d heard that in some places, there was a tremendous demand for native English speakers and that with a language and literature degree I would definitely be able to find a job.

So I searched.

Google returned many links to blogs of Americans about my age who were studying or teaching abroad. I became a fan of one called A Better Tomorrow. It had Chow Yun Fat images in the banner and was written by a Swarthmore student studying in China. His Chinese was at a level I could only dream of and his stories of traveling around China were amazing! Another one called Sinosplice was written by an English teacher in China who had previously lived in Japan.

I read both with interest and started devouring everything I could find about language learning, language teaching and where to live. I decided to go to Japan if I were accepted into the JET program. After being rejected, I chose Taiwan.

redbeanyum

Moving to Taiwan

I had a really hard time when I first got to Taiwan. I wanted to learn Chinese, but everyone else wanted to practice English. Further complicating things, Mandarin was the second language in Chiayi (嘉義), the city where I was living. There wasn’t a language school for foreigners either.

Additionally, I was only the second American at the English school where I was teaching and the Canadian teachers completely shunned the other American… and me. It was during the 2nd Iraq War, anti-American sentiments were strong amongst many Europeans and especially Canadians and I was surrounded by young, ideologically motivated Canadians who literally believed discriminating against Americans (or at least those who pay taxes) was the morally correct position. Yikes.

I did manage to win over some of my coworkers after a month or so, but still it wasn’t the right environment for me. I didn’t believe the school was that effective. I loved the city and how I bicycle everywhere and I loved how friendly people were, but I just wasn’t learning any Chinese or advancing my career.

Moving to Taipei

Taipei was like a different world. Even then, the MRT was amazing and the city was incredibly walkable. Everything cost 20% than I was used to, except housing which was at least triple. There were tons of schools for learning Chinese. It was a stretch to afford tuition on part-time work but I did it.

The teaching methods and materials are the subject of another post, but in the end I was able to make some good progress despite them. I credit the many language learning blogs I was reading at the time for giving me both the inspiration and the know-how to succeed in such a difficult environment back in the days before language learning podcasts or apps had arrived and we were all looking up Chinese characters by radicals and stroke order in paper dictionaries.

My learning was <a=”http://www.fluentinmandarin.com/content/the-7-chinese-learning-mistakes-that-cost-me-a-year-of-my-life/”>incredibly slow and I couldn’t afford to study every semester. I also wasn’t making any forward progress on the work front. I was doing a marginally better job of teaching my students, but at its core it was unskilled work and the structure of the curriculum and business prevented me or any foreign teachers from making significant improvements.

Choosing to invest in new skills

I realized my work was essentially a commodity. I might get a slightly better wage through negotiation or becoming a popular teacher, but I was a very easily replaceable cog in a huge machine. There wasn’t much possibility of advancement either—to best of my knowledge the company didn’t tend to promote non-ethnically Chinese people.

The best opportunity I saw was to gain more skills that would make it possible for me to land a much better paying teaching job. There was also the option to pursue credentials, such as a TEFL certificate, but TEFL teachers are also largely commoditized and as I had learned even back then the TEFL training is highly opinionated but poorly backed by research. Some ideas, such as not using the students’ native language at all are clearly driven more by market prices of employing bilingual teachers than they are by what’s best for the students. Unsurprisingly, a TEFL certification is worth almost nothing in terms of increased earnings.

The climb

I worked hard at learning classroom-related language and started coming in to work early and watching my local co-teachers when they taught their half of classes. Within a few months I was able to get a job at 750NT an hour as opposed to my original 550NT. I had to prepare some materials for class and grade homework but there was a lot of latitude in terms of creating supplementary materials and learning how to be a better teacher when not following a very structured system from a large chain.

About six months after that, I got a job at a larger school with even more stringent requirements at 900NT/hr. I left that job months later due to a stupid contract they wanted me to sign that would have given them broad ownership of things I created on my own time. Their top teacher from the previous hired me at 1100NT/hr with a 50NT raise every 6 months and profit sharing if I stayed long-term. I moved out to his new school that week.

My blog

At this point, I had been living in Taiwan for two and a half years and was earning more than double the average foreign English teacher. I was 26 years old and I could speak two foreign languages very different from my native one.

I’d read dozens of books about language teaching and language acquisition and was teaching well over a hundred kids and doing it vastly more effectively than I’d seen at any other school. As my life situation improved, I became increasingly focused on helping others—my students, language students in general and other language teachers.

I’ll be honest. I felt I had something worth sharing.

So that’s what I did. I wrote about what I’d seen in the job market for foreign English teachers, I wrote reviews of my Chinese text books. I spent an entire day using my virtually non-existent programming abilities to hack together a tool for adding tone marks to pinyin. I even shared my investment ideas and every single trade I made.

Looking back on it, it kind of amazes me how enthusiastically I wrote about everything and how much time I spent on it even back when it was such a tiny group of people reading.

Part 2: meeting other bloggers

The English teaching market is massive and growing. For a lot of people from the US, UK or commonwealth countries, it’s a great way to travel while young and experience more of the world. Online teaching is growing at an even more explosive rate—14.2% per year in Asia, 13.8% per year in Latin America. (Ambient Insight: 2011-2016 World Wide English Language Learning Market Overview)

Why teach English online?

Teaching online has a few advantages over traditional classroom teaching. It’s flexible, it’s efficient and it’s also becoming the first place aspiring students look.

Working online tends to be flexible

If you’re teaching online, you can teach from anywhere. This means you don’t have to worry about visas. You don’t have to travel if you don’t want to. Or you could move to someplace really inexpensive in Eastern Europe or SE Asia and teach students from first world countries at a salary much higher than you would earn locally. It’s fantastic work for a Digital Nomad who wants to save more money.

There are several ways of teaching languages online that fairly closely mirror the experience of teaching at a university or in a cram school. Those are pretty inflexible, but there are also a lot of options that give you more scheduling flexibility. TutorABC is kind of a middle of the road option that will give you some training materials and guidance, but expects you to get a TEFL certificate and to be available during certain times that have high student demand. At the top of the flexibility spectrum, Italki and Verbling offer the teacher full freedom to chose the hours they are available.

Efficiency—there’s no commute better than no commute

It should go without saying that if you teach online you have the best commute in the world.

online english teacher's commute

More and more students are moving online

The major reason why online English learning is growing at roughly 14% per year for in Asia and Latin America is that the students are moving online. Children are generally augmenting traditional schooling with some educational apps and other products, but many, many adults are moving to online classes. One of the starkest examples is in Japan.

A couple of years ago, the Japanese “eikaiwa” or English conversation class market went through yet another shock as has become common over the past few decades. The market as a whole is growing, but not at anything like the rate that it was during the 80s. This time however, the largest online school RareJob, came out a huge winner. Founded in 2007 in the Philippines, RareJob had about 70,000 students in October of 2012 and grew to over 200,000 by early 2014. At the same time, more and more Japanese students have been joining online learning platforms such as Italki.

Teaching offline is still huge. It still offers pretty all the benefits I got from doing it a decade ago. But online teaching is growing quickly, which means there are special opportunities for people who jump in now.

Who can teach English online?

The requirements vary from job to job, of course. But you should be able to find some sort of English teaching job online if you:

  • Are a Native English speaker
  • Have a reliable internet connection suitable for video chat
  • Are over 16 years old
  • Have at least a willingness to learn how to teach effectively
  • Can take payment online (Paypal, etc)
  • Enjoy talking with people

You can get better teaching work if you meet any of the criteria below:

  • Have experience teaching
  • Are physically attractive, friendly and/or competent looking
  • Know how to market your services
  • Have a teaching certification or degree
  • Know a language spoken by a lot of English learners (Chinese, Spanish, Japanese, etc)
  • Have a very flexible schedule

Basically, most people who are reading this article can teach online. About half the platforms I’ve seen want teachers with some experience. Requirements for specific degrees are rare outside of the online classrooms affiliated with brick and mortar institutions, and requirements for teaching certificates are pretty rare as well. I don’t know of any online platforms that require teachers to be bilingual, but it’s definitely an asset. I’ve see quite a few taking advantage of their foreign language skills to connect with students and teach them more effectively, especially beginners who just can’t understand that much English yet.

The downsides of teaching online

I would be remiss if I didn’t point out a few things that aren’t ideal about teaching a foreign language over video chat. It’s a huge, global opportunity but there are some areas where it falls short compared to actually being in a classroom environment.

Your improvement as a teacher is up to you

In general, you can’t expect to get much help or training from your schools. It’s somewhat questionable whether an in person school will really give you that much training. When I was running an English school in Taiwan, I had an extensive training system that involved trainees watch dozens of classes, take notes and slowly ease into teaching 5 minute segments, 15 minute segments, full classes and then one week substitutions before being given a class of their own to take over for a full semester. I gave them feedback and made sure they mastered each skill they needed along the way. Many brick and mortar schools don’t put so much into training, but some do. You can be almost certain an online school won’t.

Even if you’re a traditional language school that doesn’t offer much training, you can still probably find some opportunity to watch a more experienced teacher teach the same material you teach. You could also probably ask them questions at lunch or between classes.

Less certainty

Any language school can go out of business or shut down. But things are moving quickly in the online world. What’s an incredible opportunity now might be gone in a few years. One individual site might suddenly lose 70% of their site traffic due to an update in Google’s search ranking algorithms and have to start firing teachers. A school might suddenly pivot from using teachers for one on one classes to hosting their own pre-recorded classes. You really have to be willing to tolerate a bit more uncertainty if you’re working online. Fortunately, you’ll likely have multiple platforms you’re teaching on and maybe other income streams as well.

The entire world is competing with you

The entire world is competing with you online
Crowd, by James Cridland

Remember that school I mentioned in the section about more students moving online? The biggest online English school in Japan? Well, RareJob Inc is based in the Philippines. Their teachers make about $2 per hour. If you’re in any country where English is the native language, you probably don’t want to teach for $2 per hour. But that’s what you’re competing against. Everybody is on the internet.

There are other teachers such as Gabby Wallace who have built huge personal brands and teach large numbers of students directly. Next in line are people with niche brands who teach groups on their own sites. Even tutoring one on one on a large platform can turn out well.  Chad Hansen has earned over $100k tutoring individual students on Verbling. But remember, if you <i>can’t</i> differentiate yourself, the wage floor is very low in an online market.

Platforms for online language teaching

Using someone else’s platform is the easiest way to get started. If you’re on your own, you’ve got to figure out how to find students. You’ll need your own website, marketing channel and more. In exchange for a (usually) modest cut of what students pay, you get placement on a high traffic site, there’s usually a decent pipeline of paying students, and the platform handles payment processing for you. Unless you already have a following, this is a great trade.

There are many, many different platforms for teaching a language online, and it’s not possible to cover all of them. Instead, I’ll list four of the largest options—TutorABC, Italki, Verbling and Udemy.

TutorABC

TutorABC is based in Taiwan and focuses on EFL for Chinese speakers. They have their own system and they have a pretty strong pipeline of students. Unlike most online schools, they provide some training! Since they promote a conversational approach to learning, you don’t need to know that much about grammar, phonics or other features of English. As long as you’re patient, and enthusiastic you can probably get by fine.

On the downside, the pay isn’t that great. It’s only $8 per hour base plus some amount that depends on student reviews. According to reviews on Glassdoor, after bonuses, it’s about $10 per hour. They also insist that teachers are available for at least some of their times with the highest student demand (i.e. their evenings and weekends).

Recap

  • Bachelor’s degree or ESL teaching experience required
  • Teachers must have some availability during peak hours
  • Training provided
  • Conversational methods expected
  • Pays ~$10/hour

Italki

Italki is based in Hong Kong. It’s a massive platform that currently has over 1.5M language students learning over 100 different languages. There are a lot of free features—language learners can message each other, do language exchanges, write journal entries in the languages they’re learning and correct the journals others are writing in their native language.

There are two types of paid Italki tutors. There are “professional” teachers, who have to go through an application process. In general, they have to have some experience actually teaching classes in their language, but the process isn’t entirely transparent. The second type is “informal” teachers. As far as I can tell there isn’t really much of any lower bar for conversation teachers as long as they speak the language fluently.

Teachers can choose their own prices on iTalki. Professional teachers tend to charge more than conversation teachers, but there’s a huge range for both. Professional teachers who are native English speakers tend to be in the $15-20 per hour range with a few making as much as $45 per hour for specialized test preparation or business courses. Native English-speaking informal teachers are centered around $13-$17 per hour. Italki takes 15%.

After lessons are scheduled on the platform, students exchange Skype information and do their classes over video chat. Since Italki has a Chinese ICP license, they’re not blocked in China. They also support Alipay in addition to Paypal, so they’re Chinese students and teachers are very well represented.

Recap

  • Massive platform for 100+ languages
  • Teachers set their own prices
  • Italki takes 15%
  • Teachers are divided into “Professional” and “Informal” categories
  • Lessons are arranged via chat and taught on Skype
  • Well supported in China

Verbling

Verbling is a tech start-up based in San Francisco. Like Italki, it’s a platform for learners and teachers of many different languages. I would say it’s got a huge technology lead over the competition. Disclosure here: I was one of the two engineers employed on their small team up until the end of this summer, so I am definitely a bit biased! I’ll let the ongoing roll-out of new features speak for itself.

Verbling has a free “Community” chat feature I mentioned in an earlier guide on how to learn a language for under $500. It also has one on one tutoring and a newer, “Tandem” option for students to take lesson with a partner at a discounted price. European languages are particularly well represented on the platform, but unfortunately Verbling is blocked by the Chinese firewall. This doesn’t mean there aren’t any Chinese students or teachers, but it means that only the small fraction who have a VPN or other way around the firewall can use the site from within China.

Unlike iTalki, Verbling doesn’t separate teachers into professional and informal categories. There’s a high bar for all of them. Without a degree, certification or impressive experience there’s a good chance of your application being rejected. The upside of this is that Verbling doesn’t feel as much like a race to the bottom as some other platforms do. I’ve actually noticed some teachers listed both on Verbling and on iTalki with different rates! In general, I think an English teacher can charge about $20-25 per hour on Verbling. As with iTalki, there’s quite a bit of variation and a lot of it comes down to how good a teacher’s ratings, reviews and welcome videos are.

Recap

  • Large platform for many languages
  • Teachers set their own prices
  • Verbling takes 15%
  • Teacher applications must pass a high bar
  • Lessons are launched from the platform via Google Hangouts
  • Blocked in China
  • Rapidly improving platform

Udemy

Udemy is a completely different kind of beast from TutorABC, Italki, or Verbling. Rather than teach one on one lessons, instructors record videos and upload them to Udemy to be watched by however many students purchase the course. Then students can interact with the teacher via forums integrated into each video lesson on the platform.

Like the online tutoring options, Udemy instructors live and die by the ratings their students give them. Unlike the others, Udemy has huge winners. It also has a lot of courses that teachers spent weeks creating that generate little to no earnings. Udemy is also continually growing and changing, so anything specific I write about earnings splits will likely soon go out of date. That said, they take about 50%, but there are some circumstances when instructors can make a higher share.

One of Udemy’s major advantages and disadvantages is its formidable email marketing of discounts. If you allow Udemy to discount your courses, you can get massive distribution. On the other hand, it’s very likely they’ll discount your $397 English course to $19 for a weekend to make sales. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it’s something to be aware of when you’re planning, creating and pricing your course.

In general, I suggest Udemy for people who have some free time and who aren’t in a big hurry to earn more. It offers an opportunity for 95% passive income if you make a great course, but it’s high risk. Some instructors have earned over a million dollars from their courses. Many, many more have failed to earn enough for it to have been worth their while. It’s absolutely a viable way to go, but it requires some strategy and you probably won’t do very well until you have multiple courses up. In this way, it’s somewhat similar to writing ebooks for the kindle store.

Recap

  • Large platform for subjects languages
  • English-language site
  • Instructors create, and upload video courses
  • Students watch videos and can ask teachers questions in forums
  • Instructors set their own prices but Udemy often runs promotions
  • Possible to achieve huge success
  • Mostly passive income is possible
  • Most sales go to a small number of instructors

More on platforms

Every platform mentioned above has some common characteristics:

  • All of them are a great help to those who don’t know how to market.
  • All of them have technology that most language teachers wouldn’t know build or set up.
  • All of them have policies that either hamper or forbid teachers from taking their students off the platform.

As a consequence, one thing holds true regardless of whether you’re tutoring one on one, teaching classes to groups or creating educational content. Platforms are a better deal when you’re starting out than if you have a huge following. After you have more success, it makes more sense to build your own site like Gabby Wallace did.

Concluding advice

There are a ton of ways to teach English online and even this lengthy article could only cover the largest of them. If you’re looking for quick, simple advice then I’d choose based on your current situation.

If you’re living someplace cheap and don’t have much experience teaching, try Italki (as an informal teacher) and TutorABC.

If you have more teaching experience, apply to Italki (as a professional teacher) and Verbling.

If you have time (e.g. you teach English 20 hours a week in Korea), then try Udemy.

If you’re already very good at teaching online or building courses on platforms, then start building your own following.

If you want to teach but have no experience and no savings, then teach offline first.


I’ve noticed a bunch of you are looking for teachers or jobs in the comments.

Here’s a document for you to add yourself to instead 😀